Open Access


We're hosting a 5-day Impact Challenge during Open Access Week specifically designed for graduate students, postdocs, and early career researchers. Every week day, participants will receive an e-mail with instructions to complete one small task. These daily tasks will help them:

  • Curate their online presence
  • Make their work more discoverable
  • Leverage social media to make connections and get the word out about their work
  • Track citations and other mentions of their scholarship
  • Find disciplinary research networks online
 
Sign up for our 5-day impact challenge!
 
 
 

What is Open Access?

Open Access logo and text

Open access (OA) content is freely available to anyone with Internet access and generally allows for reuse and/or remixing (usually with attribution). The author retains their rights to the content and chooses a license that suits their needs. Want to know more? Read our F.A.Q.

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Open Access Policies at Columbia

Why Publish Open access?

VISIBILITY You want colleagues without access to expensive journals to be able to find and read your work without having to pay exorbitant access fees.

PUBLIC INTEREST Your research is of potential public interest and you want to make sure it can be found and read.

REUSABILITY You want to make your educational materials, research, or data available for reuse and remixing by others.

COMPLIANCE Your funder requires that you make your research and/or data publicly available.

INNOVATION Your work is too interdisciplinary or too innovative to fit in any of the traditional journals in your field.

ETHICS You object to the enormous profit margins of the big publishers (35%).

INCREASED CITATION COUNTS Studies have shown that publicly available work is cited more widely and more often.

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How to Publish Open Access

Open-access publishing venues include many journals, institutional repositories for anything from conference papers to code such as Columbia's Academic Commons, and disciplinary repositories for preprints and other research materials such as ArXivHumanities Commons CORE, bioRxiv, EarthChem, PhilPapers, and Zenodo (see disciplinary directory). Multidisplinary open-access data repositories include DataverseFigShare, and the Open Science Framework. To search a global registry of research data repositories, visit re3data.org

How to Open Up Access to Previously Published Work

Already publish something in a closed-access journal? Did you know that many if not most publishers will agree to your archiving (and preserving!) a copy of your article or book in an open-access repository such as Academic Commons? Making work openly available infuses it with new life and provides it the opportunity to have broad, global, equitable reach.

Use this tool to check your article publisher’s policies around OA sharing. If it looks like you can't share, don't despair! Many publishers are willing to negotiate. Use this website, from the Authors’ Alliance, to renegotiate your contract with your publisher and get permission to legally share your work openly.

If you want to make a copy of a monograph or other published research output openly available, check your contract and then contact Copyright Advisory Services here at Columbia.

Open Access Resources

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Academic Commons

Providing open, persistent access to the scholarship produced by researchers in the Columbia community.

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Directory of Open Access Journals 

A searchable database of thousands of open scholarly and scientific journals.

Idealis

The Idealis 

Overlay journal highlighting the best open-access research in scholarly communication.

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SHERPA/RoMEO 

Database listing open-access and sharing policies of most journals and publilshers.

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SPARC

Alliance of research libraries working to correct imbalances in the scholarly publishing system.