Research Without Borders: Open Access in the Americas

Please join us for “Research Without Borders: Open Access in the Americas”our final event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 3-5pm on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 in Presidential Rooms 2 & 3 of Columbia’s Faculty House (directions here.) It is free and open to the public. No RSVP is required.
Live webcast link: http://scholcomm.columbia.edu/events/live-webcast/
National-level policies around open access to research differ around the world, and the issues at stake around public accessibility to research demand an international perspective. In this panel event, the current landscape of open access policy development in the USA, Canada, and Latin America will be compared and contrasted. Panelists with views from across the Americas will explore and discuss the differing national perspectives around open access to research.
Our panelists:
Heather Joseph is the Executive Director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), the convener of the Alliance for Taxpayer Access, serves on the board of the Public Library of Science (PLOS), and recently completed a term as the elected President of theSociety for Scholarly Publishing.
Michael Sinatra is Associate Professor of English at the Université de Montréal, the President (French) of the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities, President of Synergies: The Canadian Information Network for Research in the Social Sciences and Humanities, and a founding member of the steering committee of Nines (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-century Electronic Scholarship.)
Dominique Babini is the Open Access Program coordinator at CLACSO-Latin American Council on Social Sciences, scholarly communications researcher at the University of Buenos Aires, Experts Committee of the Argentine National System of Digital Repositories, and consultant for UNESCO-Global Open Access Portal.
Our moderator:
Pamela Graham is Director of Global Studies and the Center for Human Rights Documentation & Research at Columbia University. She is active in the Latin American North East Libraries Consortium (LANE) and the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), and previously served for twelve years as Latin American and Iberian Studies Librarian in the Area Studies Division of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.
This event is the final event this academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is co-sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services‘ Scholarly Communication Program and the Digital Humanities Center. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu. 
A version of this press release can be found on the Columbia Libraries/Information Services website here.
The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.
The Digital Humanities Center (DHC) is a research and instructional facility of the Columbia University Libraries that helps Columbia faculty and students incorporate computer-based textual, bibliographic, image, and video information into their research, study, and teaching.
Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

Research Without Borders: Negotiating Constraints and Open Scholarship

Please join us for "Research Without Borders: Negotiating Constraints and Open Scholarship", our third event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 1-3pm on Thursday, February 27, 2014 in Garden Room 1 of Columbia's Faculty House (directions here.) It is free and open to the public. No RSVP is required.

How is research produced, accessed, and distributed in the presence of constraints? What does it mean for underserved communities to have research openly accessible to them? How does community participation in research change the nature of that research, and how do academia and society benefit? How and why should academic work be made available to the public? 

Points of discussion will include: exploring the ways research is being made openly accessible to overcome these constraints, how and why researchers have incorporated community participation into their projects, and alternative scholarship distribution models.

Our panelists:

Leith Mullings is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at CUNY. Her research and writing focuses on structures of inequality and resistance to them, and through the lens of feminist and critical race theory she has analyzed topics including women’s roles, religion, representation, health disparities, and social movements, both in urban communities in the USA and in Africa. Many of her projects have utilized community participation methods in her research. She has written and edited several books, and has won awards including the Society for the Anthropology of North America Prize for Distinguished Achievement in the Critical Study of North America. From 2011 to 2013, she served as President of the American Anthropological Association.

Dennis Tenen (@dennistenen) is Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities and New Media Studies at Columbia University in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. He writes and teaches in the field of computational culture studies both as in the critical study of computational culture and in the sense of applying computational approaches to the study of culture. Tenen is Senior Principle Investigator for piracyLab, an academic research collective exploring the impact of piracy on the spread of knowledge around the world. Tenen received his doctorate in Comparative Literature from Harvard in 2011, where he co-taught the university’s first-ever course on digital humanities. His writes about his research at http://dennistenen.com.

Lela Prashad (@lelap) is co-founder and Chief Data Scientist at NiJeL. In her role at NiJel, she collaborates with organizations to help them tell their stories through data and mapping, and opens two-way lines of communication and participation with both the communities she is working with and with the public. Prashad directed the 100 Cities Project at Arizona State University until 2012 and is still active in urban research with the school. Prior to NiJeL she established and ran the water program for the environmental non-profit Our moderator:

Manan Ahmed (@sepoy) is Assistant Professor of History at Columbia University. His work focuses on the relationship between text, space, and narrative, and his areas of specialization include political and cultural history of Islam in South and Southeast Asia, frontier-spaces and the city in medieval South Asia, imperial and colonial historiography, and philology. Ahmed is involved in Digital Humanities projects, especially with visualizing space in medieval texts and texualizing medieval and early-modern maps. He is currently working on a study of the early 13th century account of Uch, Sind. Ahmed received his Ph.D from the University of Chicago in 2008, and blogs at Chapati Mystery.

 

This event is the third event this academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is co-sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information ServicesScholarly Communication Program and the Digital Humanities Center. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.

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The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services. 

The Digital Humanities Center (DHC) is a research and instructional facility of the Columbia University Libraries that helps Columbia faculty and students incorporate computer-based textual, bibliographic, image, and video information into their research, study, and teaching.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

Open Access Petition Gathers over 500 Signatures


Photo Courtesy WikiMedia Commons

 

To celebrate Open Access Week 2013, from October 21-25, the librarians of Columbia University and partners from Barnard and the Union Theological Seminary spent the whole week on College Walk (and one day in the International Affairs building) talking to any and everyone about open access and Academic Commons, Columbia’s institutional repository. In just five days, over 500 people signed our petition in favor of a greater commitment to making quality research from Columbia open access and freely available. We chatted with people from many different roles and fields within the Columbia community and handed out flyers with information about Academic Commons and why open access to research is beneficial to scholars and the public.


Who signed the petition?

Schools with the greatest number of petition signers

 

The School of International and Public Affairs came out on top with 87 signatures. Engineering and Applied Science came next with an impressive 50 signatures. Students and scholars from fields as varied as Middle Eastern studies and medicine also signed. In fact, so many schools and departments were represented that we could not fit them all on one graph.


Our Message


“I support open access at Columbia University. I believe that researchers and scholars should make their scholarly publications and the data on which they are based accessible to the public, to the extent permitted by legal and ethical considerations, through a digital repository based at Columbia University (e.g., Academic Commons) or through an appropriate alternative open-access repository.” - Text of the Columbia Open Access Petition


Open access to research will enhance the progress of scholarly communication by broadening the reach of research, both to other scholars and to the public. Increased access to high quality research can inform the practice of professionals; inspire bright young scholars; and make a real difference in developing nations. Encouraging commitment to the practice of open access at Columbia will facilitate access to world class research, benefiting the scholarly community and the public. This was the message that motivated over 500 members of the Columbia community to sign the petition.


Academic Commons as open access platform

 


"Academic Commons is a freely accessible digital collection of research done at Columbia University or one of its affiliate institutions, including Barnard College, Teachers College, Union Theological Seminary, and Jewish Theological Seminary. It is a place where Columbia-affiliated students, faculty, staff and anyone participating in Columbia events or groups can archive the digital results of their research or scholarly works and share them with the world at large.About Academic Commons


Another aspect of our outreach during Open Access Week 2013 was sharing information about Academic Commons (AC), Columbia’s open access institutional research repository. Anyone in the Columbia community can deposit their scholarly work into AC and enjoy the benefits it provides. Work deposited in AC is indexed by popular search engines such as Bing and Google Scholar. Authors who deposit also have peace of mind that their digital work is preserved for the long term, receive a permanent URL to their work, and get regular download reports. With more than 11,000 items and more being added every day, AC is a thriving repository that brings Columbia’s research to the world.


Authors who are committed to the principles of open access can also publish their work in one of many high quality open access journals. Columbia supports authors who wish to publish in open access journals with the Columbia Open-Access Publication (COAP) fund to underwrite publication fees that some open access journals charge.

 

Visit Academic Commons to peruse openly available research from Columbia scholars.

 

See more resources for open access at Columbia here.


The Open Access Button

A new initiative to track the effects of paywalled research and to help users find open access resources, the Open Access Button, launched this week. This browser bookmarklet aggregates data that users contribute after hitting a paywall and helps users to find the resources they need in open access platforms. The user data is represented on a map that depicts the challenges researchers worldwide face in accessing published papers. Here's the rationale behind the project, as described on the site:

People are denied access to research hidden behind paywalls every day. This problem is invisible, but it slows innovation, kills curiosity and harms patients. This is an indictment of the current system. Open Access has given us the solution to this problem by allowing everyone to read and re-use research. We created the Open Access Button to track the impact of paywalls and help you get access to the research you need. By using the button you’ll help show the impact of this problem, drive awareness of the issue, and help change the system. Furthermore, the Open Access Button has several ways of helping you get access to the research you need right now.

After less than a week in operation, the Open Access Button has already aggregated nearly 600 instances of researchers hitting paywalls, mostly in the U.S. and Europe. Keep an eye on this project, and contribute your own experiences with paywalls.

More information about how to use the Open Access Button here.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

Research Without Borders 11/12 | Expanding Public Access to Research

All — please join us for "Expanding Public Access to Federally Funded Research: Implementing the OSTP Memo", our second event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 12-2pm on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 on the third floor of Columbia's Faculty House. It is free and open to the public. No RSVP is required.

in a policy memorandum released in February 2013, the White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy Director John Holdren directed federal agencies to develop plans to make the published results of federally funded research freely available to the public within one year of publication, and required researchers to better account for and manage the digital data resulting from federally funded scientific research. Panelists will discuss and debate major proposals for addressing the directive – CHORUS, SHARE, and NIH policies.

Our panelists:

Alicia Wise is Director of Universal Access at Elsevier, where she manages Elsevier’s access strategy and policies and launches and monitors access pilot projects. Alicia previously worked for the UK Joint Information Systems Committee, the Publishers Licensing Society, The Publishers Association, and as an academic archaeologist, and holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.

Neil Thakur is Special Assistant to the Deputy Director for Extramural Research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He also serves as program manager for the NIH Public Access Policy. Prior to his time at NIH, he was Assistant Director of Health Services Research and Development at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Neil holds a Ph.D. in Health Policy from Yale University School of Public Health and completed a NIMH postdoctoral fellowship in mental health services research at the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Judy Ruttenberg is the program director for the Transforming Research Libraries strategic direction. Her responsibilities also include the E-Research Working Group and the Transforming Special Collections in the Digital Age Working Group. Prior to joining ARL, Judy was a program officer at the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN). Judy holds an MLS from the University of Maryland College Park, an MA in history from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and a BA from the University of Michigan.

Our moderator:

Elwin Wu is an Associate Director of the Columbia University School of Social Work Social Intervention Group and the Co-Director of the HIV Intervention Science Training Program for Racial/Ethnic Minority New Investigators. His practice experience includes direct clinical practice with individuals, couples, and groups with agencies serving primarily the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities; evaluation of violence prevention programs for perpetrators of intimate partner violence in same-sex relationships; and program development and evaluation for criminal justice-involved adolescents and adults.

 

This event is the second event this academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information ServicesScholarly Communication Program. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.

______________

The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

NB: This event is listed on the Columbia Libraries website here.

Open Access Week 2013 at Columbia: October 21-25

Hey, Columbia – it's Open Access Week!

Open Access Week is a global event now in its 6th year, which promotes open access as a new norm in scholarship and research. Open access (OA) content is online, freely accessible, and has relatively few or no restrictions on reuse. As the The Open Access Week website argues, we at Columbia should be advocating for open access because it has "the potential to maximize research investments, increase the exposure and use of published research, facilitate the ability to conduct research across available literature, and enhance the overall advancement of scholarship."

All this week (October 21-25) at Columbia, we folks from the Scholarly Communication Program, an initiative of Columbia's Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, along with our friends at Columbia Libraries/Information Services, are out on campus all day every day talking to students, faculty, and staff about open access, its benefits, and why it's relevant to them. We're also asking anyone and everyone to sign a petition in favor of open access of research at Columbia, which calls for faculty members and officers of administration to make their research articles freely available to the public through online repositories, such as Academic Commons, Columbia’s open access digital repository. Oh, and we're making buttons and giving out an absurd amount of cookies.

You can sign our petition in support of open access to research at Columbia University here.

Looking forward to seeing you all out on campus! Here's to open access and sharing knowledge :)

For a full listing of all Open Access Week events happening worldwide, visit the official Open Access Week website here. Columbia's event is listed on the Open Access Week website here.

Research Without Borders Event 9/24: Social Media and the Research Cycle

How is social media changing the way researchers and scholars communicate with each other, on their campuses, and with the public? Why should researchers make use of social media? Which social media channels should scholars make use of? How can researchers find the time to have an online presence, and what kind of information should they share?

Join us for "Communicating Your Research: Social Media and the Research Cycle", our kickoff event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place at 12pm on Tuesday September 24, 2013 on the second floor of Columbia's Faculty House. It is free and open to the public. No RSVP is required.

At every stage in the research cycle – planning, researching, preserving, publishing, and distributing – social media is being used by researchers and scholars to communicate, collaborate, promote their research, and debate. As scholars increasingly move their work to the web, and with an estimated third of all scholars now active on Twitter, conversations that previously took place within campus walls are now open for the world to pitch in. The benefits of using social media in the academy have been cited, among myriad others, as democratization, widening participation, and engaging new audiences on a global level. But these rapid changes come with challenges: steep learning curves in new technologies for many, committing to public engagement, and embedding social media in everyday work flows. 

On the panel:

Adeline Koh (@adelinekoh) is Director of the Digital Humanities Center and and assistant professor of literature at Richard Stockton College. Her work spans the intersections between postcolonial studies and the digital humanities, 19th/20th Century British and Anglophone Literature and Southeast Asian and African studies, and games in higher education. Adeline runs the postcolonial digital humanities website and tumblr blog with Roopika Risam. She is also a core contributor to the Profhacker Column at the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Roopika Risam (@roopikarisamis Assistant Professor of World Literature and English Education at Salem State University. She works to address the intersections of postcolonial studies and minority discourse in the United States and the role of digital humanities in mediating between the two. Roopika has contributed to Postcolonial Studies @ Emory, a digital humanities project that provides a home for postcolonial studies on the web, and runs the postcolonial digital humanities website and tumblr blog with Adeline Koh. She is currently serving on the Modern Language Association's Delegate Assembly.

Joshua Drew (@Drew_Lab) is a lecturer in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology at Columbia University, where he runs the MA in Conversation Biology program and teaches and conducts research on the evolution and conservation of marine biodiversity. Joshua is exploring a variety of avenues to bring the science to the public, which include blogging his research, making web videos, working with Helen Scales to help better tell the stories from their field work in Fiji, and myriad other public outreach activities. Joshua strives to have a diverse lab and is a faculty advocate for LGTBQ students in Columbia University’s CU SpeakOUT group.

Laura Czerniewicz (@Czernie) is an associate professor in the Centre for Higher Education Development at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, the Director of the OpenUCT Initiative (openuct.uct.ac.za) and the founding director of the Center for Educational Technology (CET). Laura works on various local, continental and international collaborative projects, and has been involved on research into students' and academics' digitally-mediated practices for several years. She blogs from time to time at lauraczerniewicz.uct.ac.za, and can be followed on Academia.edu, with several presentations available at slideshare.net/laura_Cz.

The moderator:

Sheri Whitley (@NiaTrue) is Director of Multimedia Development at Columbia's Office of Communications & Public Affairs and a graduate student in Columbia's Department of Sociology. Her research focuses on social mobility, historical sociology, the history of race in the West, and the impact of critical race theory in Europe. Prior to working at Columbia she worked at Black Enterprise and Ms Magazine, where she was managing editor.

 

This event is the first event this academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information ServicesScholarly Communication Program. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at http://scholcomm.columbia.edu/.


 

The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

 

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

CDRS comments at meetings on White House OSTP directive

The presence of Center for Digital Research and Scholarship (CDRS) staff was felt at this week's public meetings on the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) public access policy directive. CDRS director Rebecca Kennison and Research Data Manager Amy Nurnberger both commented during meetings on public access to Publications and Data that were hosted by the National Academies on May 14-17, 2013. 

Both Kennison and Nurnberger called for consistency among Federal agency public access requirements. Reflecting our philosophy at CDRS, they also urged that these requirements include the availability of both human- and machine-readable formats, metadata based on open standards, and a commitment to long-term preservation. They further suggested that mechanisms and standards be put in place for existing repositories to be certified as "trusted repositories" for the products of federally funded research.

Read Kennison's and Nurnberger's full comments here.

White House Directive on Public Access to Federally Funded Research

All researchers who receive Federal funding should note that on February 22, 2013, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) issued a memorandum to the heads of executive departments and agencies on increasing public access to Federally funded research. The memo directed agencies with over $100 million in annual extramural R&D budgets to develop a public access plan for the results of research–meaning scientific publications and digital scientific data–directly arising from their funds.

What Do You Need to Know?

1. Draft public access plans are due in August 2013.

2. Here is a tentative list of affected departments and agencies:

  • Department of Agriculture
  • Department of Defense
  • Department of Education
  • Department of Energy
  • Department of Interior
  • Environmental Protection Agency
  • Institute of Museum and Library Services
  • National Aeronautics and Space Administration
  • National Endowment for the Humanities
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Science Foundation

3. During the week of May 13, the National Research Council (NRC) Division on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE) will hold two planning meetings–one for publications and one for data–on the public access directive. The meetings are open to the public and will be webcast, but you must register for either option. Learn more and register on the DBASSE website.

How the public access plans will be implemented, and on what timeline, is an open question. We'll pass along new information as it becomes available.

Live Webcast: The Challenge of Communicating Computational Research

On Thursday, April 4 at noon we'll be livestreaming the Research Without Borders event "The Challenge of Communicating Computational Research." Watch on our Live Webcast page.

The speakers are Neil Chue Hong, Director of the Software Sustainability Institute; Matthew Jockers, Assistant Professor of English at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln; and Dan Ellis, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering at Columbia. Victoria Stodden of the Columbia Statistics department will moderate.

Read more about the event here. You can also follow the discussion live on Twitter at http://twitter.com/ScholarlyComm.