Research Without Borders Panel: Effecting Change in Scholarly Communication: Opportunities and Costs

Please join Columbia University Libraries’ Scholarly Communication Program for the next installation in our Research Without Borders event series, “Effecting Change in Scholarly Communication: Opportunities and Costs.” This event will take place from 2-4pm on Monday, November 21, 2016 in Garden Room 2 of Columbia’s Faculty House. It is free and open to the public, but we do ask that you register for the event using the “Reserve Your Seat” button on the Columbia Events page, available here.

The panel consists of stakeholders and observers across the scholarly enterprise who have worked to understand and effect purposeful change in the ways scholars and researchers communicate with each other. Their work seeks to better assess the costs of change and the motivations and challenges facing forward momentum across disciplinary domains, institutional initiatives, and publication practices.

 
 
Our panelists:

MacKenzie Smith, University Librarian, University of California-Davis Libraries. MacKenzie will be speaking about the Pay-It-Forward report: an investigation into a sustainable model of open access article processing charges for large North American research institutions.

Kevin Hawkins, Assistant Dean for Scholarly Communication, University of North Texas Libraries. Kevin will be discussing Project Meerkat, a project aimed “to develop guidelines and standards for digital scholarly monograph usage data and to construct a neutral organizational apparatus for the ongoing collection and aggregation of data about these scholarly publications,” and the resulting cooperative to be developed out of that project, the Publishing Analytics Data Alliance.

Peter Muennig,  Associate Professor, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. Peter will be speaking about the ourJournal open source journal publishing initiative.

This event is part of our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is sponsored by Columbia University Libraries’ Scholarly Communication Program. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm.


The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries.

“Research Without Borders” Panel to Discuss Open GIS

Please join Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Center for Digital Research and Scholarship’s Scholarly Communication Program for “Open GIS: Extending Boundaries”, the second event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 2-4pm on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 in Rooms 522 & 523 of Columbia’s Butler Library It is free and open to the public.

Welcome to GIS Day! This event is centered on issues of open Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Geography shapes our world, but historically geographical information has been a closely guarded secret. As information itself becomes increasingly ubiquitous so does the potential for us to experience and use geographical information to increase our understanding of the world and expand the dimensions of research. What are the opportunities for discovering and accessing today’s Geographical Information Systems (GIS) frameworks and data? What are the risks posed by increased discoverability and accessibility? Panelists will address a variety of perspectives on what it means to be open with respect to GIS; what it requires, e.g., open access, open software, #opendata, and data reuse; and the tension between open and historically closed information systems.

RSVP for admission to venue: http://bit.ly/RWOBrsvp

Our panelists:

Carson Farmer, Assistant Professor of Geography, University of Colorado at Boulder

Laxmi Ramasubramanian, Associate Professor of Planning and Design,  Hunter College, City University of New York

Xinyue Ye, Assistant Professor of Geography  and Director, Computational Social Science Lab, Kent State University

Our moderator:

Robert S. Chen, Director,  Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), Earth Institute, Columbia University

This event is the second event of the 2015-2016 academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Scholarly Communication Program and Digital Social Science Center. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.

Co-located event: GEOGRAPHY 2050: Exploring Our Future in an Urbanized World, November 19-20, 2015 · New York City


The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

Digital Social Science Center The Digital Social Science Center (DSSC) brings together people, equipment, and information resources in an environment where users can work collaboratively, individually, or in consultation with a librarian and/or technology specialist. DSSC is located in Lehman Library and provides a wide range of information and technology assistance for students and faculty, including GIS.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

RWB20151118GIS

 

“Research Without Borders” Panel to Discuss Institutions and Public Access Requirements

Please join Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Center for Digital Research and Scholarship’s Scholarly Communication Program for “Researcher Success: Institutions and Public Access Requirements”, the first event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 2-4pm on Thursday, October 29, 2015 in Presidential Room 1 of Columbia’s Faculty House. It is free and open to the public.

The event is centered around institutional and faculty perspectives and approaches in response to funding agencies’ requirements for public access to research results. Panel respondents will focus on the following questions: How are institutions enabling researcher success in this changing environment? What are the expectations for institutional and researcher roles? What is the role of academic libraries in supporting the transition? Panel participants represent diverse perspectives on the challenges and opportunities to the organization in sustaining researcher success, viewing these issues from the library, faculty, and administrative perspectives.

Our panelists:

Anne Langley, Associate Dean for Research, Collections and Scholarly Communications, Penn State University.

Timothy Clark, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School and Director, Biomedical Informatics Core, Massachusetts General Hospital.

Stephanie Scott, Director, Communications & Outreach, Sponsored Projects Administration, Columbia University.

Our moderator:

Ann Thornton, University Librarian and Vice Provost, Columbia University.

This event is the first event of the 2015-2016 academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Scholarly Communication Program. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.


The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

“Research Without Borders” Panel to Discuss Fair Use in Art and Photography

Please join Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Center for Digital Research and Scholarship’s Scholarly Communication Program and the Copyright Advisory Office for “Research Without Borders: Fair Use, Appropriation Art and Photography”, the third event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 2-4pm on Monday, February 23, 2015 in Garden Room 2 on the 1st Floor of Columbia’s Faculty House. It is free and open to the public. If you plan to attend, please RSVP to lwilliams@columbia.edu.

“Fair use” allows the use of copyrighted materials without permission from the copyright holder under certain circumstances, offering important opportunities for educators, researchers, and others to make reasonable use of copyrighted materials. Fair use is constantly evolving: laws around fair use apply differently to different users in different situations, and fair use determinations in courts need to be made on a case-by-case basis. To mark Fair Use Week 2015, a community celebration of fair use coordinated by the Association of Research Libraries, the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship’s Scholarly Communication Program and the Copyright Advisory Office are hosting a panel discussion around freedom of expression in art and photography as it relates to fair use. Panelists will discuss fair use from different perspectives in librarianship, copyright law, photojournalism, and copyright activism, and explore the opportunities and impediments that fair use in art and photography presents.

Our panelists:

Greg Cram (@GregCram), Associate Director of Copyright and Information Policy at The New York Public Library. Greg works to make the Library’s collections broadly available to researchers and the public at large, and is responsible for developing and implementing policy and practices around the use of the Library’s collections, both online and in the Library’s physical spaces. Greg has helped steer projects through a maze of complex intellectual property issues, including the recent release of more than 20,000 high-resolution images of public domain maps. Greg is a licensed attorney in New York and Massachusetts and has represented the New York Public Library in advocating for better copyright policy, testifying before Congress about the first sale doctrine and before the United States Copyright Office about orphan works.

Rachelle Browne, Associate General Counsel, Smithsonian Institution and Adjunct Lecturer at Goucher College’s Masters in Arts Administration program. Rachelle is the co-chair of “Legal Issues in Museum Administration,” a course co-sponsored by the Smithsonian and the American Law Institute. She is a former staff attorney and attorney-advisor at the Federal Trade Commission, and general counsel to U.S. Virgin Islands Legislature and Department of Commerce.

Mickey H. Osterreicher (@nppalawyer), General Counsel for the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA); of Counsel to Hiscock & Barclay, LLP in the Media & First Amendment Law Practice Area. Mickey is on the governing board of the American Bar Association Communications Law Forum, the Media Law Resource Center (MLRC) newsgathering committee and the First Amendment Lawyers Association (FALA). Mickey is co-chair of the fair use subcommittee of the ABA Section of Intellectual Property Law section, and has drafted comments to the U.S. Copyright Office. Mickey is a Trustee of the Alexia Foundation, promoting world peace and cultural understanding through the power of photojournalism, and a member of the board of CEPA Gallery, a not-for-profit arts center. Mickey’s work has appeared in such publications as the New York Times and Time.

Parker Higgins (@xor), Director of Copyright Activism, Electronic Frontier Foundation. Parker specializes in issues at the intersection of freedom of speech and copyright, trademark, and patent law. At NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University, Parker developed a concentration of “Creativity, Freedom of Speech, and Intellectual Property”, and served on the board of the global Students for Free Culture organization and as the president of its NYU chapter. Parker previously worked for SoundCloud in Berlin, Germany.

Our moderator:

Rina Elster Pantalony, Director of Columbia University’s Copyright Advisory Office. In her role at the University, Rina creates awareness, understanding, and respect for copyright in the Columbia community. Rina is also Chair of the Standing Committee on Legal Affairs for the International Council of Museums, and is former faculty member at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts Moving Image Archive Preservation Program, where she taught courses on copyright law and policy.

 

This event is the third event this academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is co-sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Scholarly Communication Program and the Copyright Advisory Office. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.

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The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Copyright Advisory Office creates awareness, understanding and respect for copyright and copyright management practices, while advocating for a robust environment that promotes preservation, access, and scholarly communications.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

A version of this press release can be found on the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship website here, and the Columbia University Libraries/Information Services website here.

Research Without Borders Panel To Discuss Big Open Data on December 4th

Please join the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship’s Scholarly Communication Programthe Data Science Institute, and the School of Continuing Education’s Information and Knowledge Strategy Program for “Research Without Borders: Big Open Data”, our second event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 2-4pm on Thursday, December 4th, 2014 in Presidential Rooms 2 & 3 on the 3rd Floor of Columbia’s Faculty House (map here.) It is free and open to the public. If you plan to attend, please RSVP to lwilliams@columbia.edu.

How are large amounts of data managed, made sense of, and made accessible? What are the challenges of working with large open datasets, and how are different academic disciplines making use of them? In this panel discussion, researchers will explore “big open data” from three perspectives: the humanities, journalism, and the social web.

Our panelists:

David Wrisley (@DJWrisley) is an Associate Professor in the Department of English and the Civilization Sequence Program at the American University of Beirut, and a Medieval Fellow at Fordham University’s Center for Medieval Studies.His research is in medieval comparative literatures and digital humanities. He is interested in the history of translation and rewriting in particular at the fifteenth-century court of Burgundy. He is also interested in Mediterranean polysystems linking post-classical Arabic and medieval European literatures, as well as digital means for archiving and visualizing them. He is working on a project about space, place and time in medieval texts entitled Visualizing Medieval Places. From 2010 to 2014, he was the chairperson of the Department of English.

Jonathan Stray (@jonathanstray) is a journalist and a computer scientist researching on information, global culture, belief, and the future of journalism. He teaches computational journalism at Columbia University, and is currently the lead on the development of the Associated Press and the Knight Foundation Overview Project, an open-source document archive analysis system for investigative journalists. As a freelancer, he has written for the New York Times, Foreign Policy, and Wired.

Alice Marwick (@alicetiara) is an Assistant Professor at Fordham University and an academic affiliate at the Center on Law and Information Policy (CLIP) at Fordham Law School. Her work investigates online identity and consumer culture through lenses of privacy, surveillance, consumption, and celebrity. Marwick’s current projects involve a study of sexism and misogynistic speech online; a long-term ethnographic research project on youth social media; and a tripartite project on conspicuous consumption involving fashion blogging, Pinterest, and Tumblr. Marwick was previously a postdoctoral researcher in the Social Media Collective at Microsoft Research New England. Her first book, Status Update: Celebrity and Attention in Web 2.0, is based on a multi-year ethnography of the San Francisco tech industry.

Our moderator:

David Park (@davidchungpark) is Dean of Strategic Initiatives at Columbia University and serves as a senior advisor to the Executive Vice President and Dean of Faculty of the Arts and Sciences. Dr. Park is a member of Columbia University’s Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering New Media Center, Director of Special Projects at the Applied Statistics Center and Fellow at the Center for the Management of Systemic Risk at Columbia University. Dr. Park is also a founding member of Columbia University’s Digital Storytelling Lab. Dr. Park has co-founded several New York based technology companies.

This event is the second event this academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is co-sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Scholarly Communication Program and the Data Science InstituteJoin the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.

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The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

A version of this press release can be found on the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship website here, and the Columbia University Libraries/Information Services website here.

 

Open Access Week at Columbia: October 20-26

Hey Columbia – it’s nearly time for Open Access Week!

Open access research is online, freely accessible, and has relatively few or no restrictions on reuse. Open Access Week (October 20-26), a global event now entering its 8th year, promotes open access as a new norm in research and scholarship. To celebrate, we’ve organized a week of events and resources to raise awareness about open access in the Columbia community. Here are the plans for the week:

Activities on Columbia’s College Walk

We at the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship’s Scholarly Communication Program, along with our colleagues from the rest of Columbia Libraries/Information Services, will be out on Columbia’s College Walk every day during the week of October 20-26 from 10am-5pm, manning tables to engage the campus community with open access. We’ll be asking faculty, staff, and students to sign a petition in support of open access to research at their departments or schools, and will be asking them to deposit their work in Academic Commons.

10/23 Screening of Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz

On Thursday, October 23, at 6pm in Barnard College’s Lehman Auditorium (202 Altschul), located in Altschul Hall, we are hosting a screening of Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz. After the screening, we’ll have an in-person Q&A with the director, Brian Knappenberger. The event is free and open to the public, and is co-sponsored by the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, Barnard Library and Academic Information Services, the Digital Humanities Center, the Digital Science Center, and the Digital Social Science Center. The event is listed on the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship’s Scholarly Communication Program website here. If you plan to attend, please RSVP to Leyla Williams, Communications Coordinator at the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, at lwilliams@columbia.edu.

Video: Open Access Movement

The Center for Digital Research and Scholarship worked with Barnard Library and Academic Information Services to produce a short film about open access, which is now up on Youtube: Open Access Movement. Please view, distribute, re-use, and enjoy!

Screening of Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz

On Thursday, October 23, at 6pm in Barnard College’s Lehman Auditorium (202 Altschul), located in Altschul Hall, we are hosting a screening of “The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz,” which will be followed by an in-person Q&A with director Brian Knappenberger. The screening is free and open to the public, and is co-sponsored by the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, Barnard Library and Academic Information Services, the Digital Humanities Center, the Digital Science Center, and the Digital Social Science Center. This event is part of our Open Access Week 2014 events.

If you plan to attend, please RSVP to Leyla Williams, Communication Coordinator at the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, at lwilliams@columbia.edu.

Internet's Own Boy Poster

Research Without Borders Panel To Discuss DIY Scholarly Publishing on September 24

Please join Columbia Libraries/Information Services’ Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ Division of Social Sciences and the Division of Humanities for “Research Without Borders: Publishing Without a Publisher? Scholars Are Doing It For Themselves“, our kick-off event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 3-5pm on Wednesday, September 24, 2014 in the Ivy Lounge on the First Floor of Columbia’s Faculty House (directions here.) It is free and open to the public. No RSVP is required.

Why are scholars choosing to self-publish their research, and how? What are the benefits of self-publication or “doing it yourself” publishing? Which academic disciplines are engaging with these publishing methods? How does the academy perceive DIY or self-publishing?

In this panel discussion, speakers will explore the ways in which scholars are self-publishing or DIY-publishing their research, and why they choose to do so. Topics of discussion will include the different forms that scholarly self-publishing take, who in the academy is self-publishing, and how academia views such efforts.

Our panelists:

Tara McPherson is Associate Professor of Critical Studies at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts and an affiliated faculty member in the American Studies and Ethnicity Department. Her research focuses on media, gender, race, affect, place, digital humanities, early software histories, and the development of new tools and paradigms for digital publishing, learning, and authorship. She is the lead PI on the Alliance for Networking Visual Culture’s new authoring platform Scalar, and the Founding Editor of Vectors, a multimedia peer-reviewed journal affiliated with the Open Humanities Press. Her book, Reconstructing Dixie: Race, Gender and Nostalgia in the Imagined South, received the 2004 John G. Cawelti Award for the outstanding book published on American Culture.

Shannon Mattern is Associate Professor in the School of Media Studies at The New School in New York. Her research and teaching address how the forms and materialities of media are related to the spaces (architectural, urban, and conceptual) they create and inhabit. She writes about libraries and archives, media infrastructures, the material qualities of media objects, media companies’ headquarters and sites of media-related labor, place branding, public design projects, urban media art, and mediated sensation. She is author of The New Downtown Library, which was supported by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts. You can find her at wordsinspace.net.

Alberto Pepe is the co-founder of Authorea, a collaborative word processor and repository for scientists. He is also a data consultant and a Research Associate at Harvard University, where he recently completed a Postdoc in Astrophysics. At Harvard, he was a fellow of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society and an affiliate of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science. He holds a Ph.D. in Information Science from the University of California, Los Angeles with a dissertation on scientific collaboration networks.

Gregg Gordon is President and CEO of the Social Science Research Network (SSRN), a leading multi-disciplinary online repository of scholarly research in the social sciences and humanities. Its eLibrary database has 560,000 papers from over 260,000 authors and users have downloaded close to 80 million full text papers since inception. Prior to helping Michael C. Jensen found SSRN in 1994, Gregg worked at KPMG and entrepreneurial companies in technology and health care. Gregg speaks around the world and writes regularly about scholarly research and the changes needed to create innovative research faster.

Our moderator:

Alondra Nelson is Dean of Social Science and professor of sociology and gender studies at Columbia University, where she has served as director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality. An interdisciplinary social scientist, she writes about the intersections of science, technology, medicine, and inequality. Her books include Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight Against Medical Discrimination; Genetics and the Unsettled Past: The Collision of DNA, Race, and History; and Technicolor: Race, Technology, and Everyday Life. Her latest book, The Social Life of DNA, will be published next year. Nelson has been a visiting fellow of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, the BIOS Center at the London School of Economics, and the Bavarian American Academy. She sits on the editorial board of Social Studies of Science, serves as an advisor to the Data & Society Research Institute, and serves as a member of the NSF-funded Council for Big Data, Ethics, and Society.

 

This event is the first event this academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is co-sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services‘ Scholarly Communication Program, the Columbia Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ (FAS) Division of Social Sciences and the FAS Division of Humanities. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.

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The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) at Columbia University includes 32 academic departments that fall within three divisions: humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. The FAS Division of Social Science comprises the departments of Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, and Sociology. Cornerstones of their respective disciplines, these departments are renowned for innovative social inquiry.

The Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) at Columbia University includes 32 academic departments that fall within three core divisions: humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. The FAS Division of Humanities comprises 13 different departments on campus.

 

 

Research Without Borders: Open Access in the Americas

Please join us for “Research Without Borders: Open Access in the Americas”our final event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 3-5pm on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 in Presidential Rooms 2 & 3 of Columbia’s Faculty House (directions here.) It is free and open to the public. No RSVP is required.
Live webcast link: http://scholcomm.columbia.edu/events/live-webcast/
National-level policies around open access to research differ around the world, and the issues at stake around public accessibility to research demand an international perspective. In this panel event, the current landscape of open access policy development in the USA, Canada, and Latin America will be compared and contrasted. Panelists with views from across the Americas will explore and discuss the differing national perspectives around open access to research.
Our panelists:
Heather Joseph is the Executive Director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), the convener of the Alliance for Taxpayer Access, serves on the board of the Public Library of Science (PLOS), and recently completed a term as the elected President of theSociety for Scholarly Publishing.
Michael Sinatra is Associate Professor of English at the Université de Montréal, the President (French) of the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities, President of Synergies: The Canadian Information Network for Research in the Social Sciences and Humanities, and a founding member of the steering committee of Nines (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-century Electronic Scholarship.)
Dominique Babini is the Open Access Program coordinator at CLACSO-Latin American Council on Social Sciences, scholarly communications researcher at the University of Buenos Aires, Experts Committee of the Argentine National System of Digital Repositories, and consultant for UNESCO-Global Open Access Portal.
Our moderator:
Pamela Graham is Director of Global Studies and the Center for Human Rights Documentation & Research at Columbia University. She is active in the Latin American North East Libraries Consortium (LANE) and the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), and previously served for twelve years as Latin American and Iberian Studies Librarian in the Area Studies Division of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.
This event is the final event this academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is co-sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services‘ Scholarly Communication Program and the Digital Humanities Center. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu. 
A version of this press release can be found on the Columbia Libraries/Information Services website here.
The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.
The Digital Humanities Center (DHC) is a research and instructional facility of the Columbia University Libraries that helps Columbia faculty and students incorporate computer-based textual, bibliographic, image, and video information into their research, study, and teaching.
Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

Research Without Borders: Negotiating Constraints and Open Scholarship

Please join us for Research Without Borders: Negotiating Constraints and Open Scholarship”, our third event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 1-3pm on Thursday, February 27, 2014 in Garden Room 1 of Columbia’s Faculty House (directions here.) It is free and open to the public. No RSVP is required.

How is research produced, accessed, and distributed in the presence of constraints? What does it mean for underserved communities to have research openly accessible to them? How does community participation in research change the nature of that research, and how do academia and society benefit? How and why should academic work be made available to the public? 

Points of discussion will include: exploring the ways research is being made openly accessible to overcome these constraints, how and why researchers have incorporated community participation into their projects, and alternative scholarship distribution models.

Our panelists:

Leith Mullings is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at CUNY. Her research and writing focuses on structures of inequality and resistance to them, and through the lens of feminist and critical race theory she has analyzed topics including women’s roles, religion, representation, health disparities, and social movements, both in urban communities in the USA and in Africa. Many of her projects have utilized community participation methods in her research. She has written and edited several books, and has won awards including the Society for the Anthropology of North America Prize for Distinguished Achievement in the Critical Study of North America. From 2011 to 2013, she served as President of the American Anthropological Association.

Dennis Tenen (@dennistenen) is Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities and New Media Studies at Columbia University in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. He writes and teaches in the field of computational culture studies both as in the critical study of computational culture and in the sense of applying computational approaches to the study of culture. Tenen is Senior Principle Investigator for piracyLab, an academic research collective exploring the impact of piracy on the spread of knowledge around the world. Tenen received his doctorate in Comparative Literature from Harvard in 2011, where he co-taught the university’s first-ever course on digital humanities. His writes about his research at http://dennistenen.com.

Lela Prashad (@lelap) is co-founder and Chief Data Scientist at NiJeL. In her role at NiJel, she collaborates with organizations to help them tell their stories through data and mapping, and opens two-way lines of communication and participation with both the communities she is working with and with the public. Prashad directed the 100 Cities Project at Arizona State University until 2012 and is still active in urban research with the school. Prior to NiJeL she established and ran the water program for the environmental non-profit Arizona PIRG, and worked with the United States Geological Survey’s Earthquake Hazards Team. Prashad holds a Master of Science in Geological Sciences from ASU.

Our moderator:

Manan Ahmed (@sepoy) is Assistant Professor of History at Columbia University. His work focuses on the relationship between text, space, and narrative, and his areas of specialization include political and cultural history of Islam in South and Southeast Asia, frontier-spaces and the city in medieval South Asia, imperial and colonial historiography, and philology. Ahmed is involved in Digital Humanities projects, especially with visualizing space in medieval texts and texualizing medieval and early-modern maps. He is currently working on a study of the early 13th century account of Uch, Sind. Ahmed received his Ph.D from the University of Chicago in 2008, and blogs at Chapati Mystery.

This event is the third event this academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is co-sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services‘ Scholarly Communication Program and the Digital Humanities Center. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.

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The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services. 

The Digital Humanities Center (DHC) is a research and instructional facility of the Columbia University Libraries that helps Columbia faculty and students incorporate computer-based textual, bibliographic, image, and video information into their research, study, and teaching.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.