“Research Without Borders” Panel to Discuss Open GIS

Please join Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Center for Digital Research and Scholarship’s Scholarly Communication Program for “Open GIS: Extending Boundaries”, the second event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 2-4pm on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 in Rooms 522 & 523 of Columbia’s Butler Library It is free and open to the public.

Welcome to GIS Day! This event is centered on issues of open Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Geography shapes our world, but historically geographical information has been a closely guarded secret. As information itself becomes increasingly ubiquitous so does the potential for us to experience and use geographical information to increase our understanding of the world and expand the dimensions of research. What are the opportunities for discovering and accessing today’s Geographical Information Systems (GIS) frameworks and data? What are the risks posed by increased discoverability and accessibility? Panelists will address a variety of perspectives on what it means to be open with respect to GIS; what it requires, e.g., open access, open software, #opendata, and data reuse; and the tension between open and historically closed information systems.

RSVP for admission to venue: http://bit.ly/RWOBrsvp

Our panelists:

Carson Farmer, Assistant Professor of Geography, University of Colorado at Boulder

Laxmi Ramasubramanian, Associate Professor of Planning and Design,  Hunter College, City University of New York

Xinyue Ye, Assistant Professor of Geography  and Director, Computational Social Science Lab, Kent State University

Our moderator:

Robert S. Chen, Director,  Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), Earth Institute, Columbia University

This event is the second event of the 2015-2016 academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Scholarly Communication Program and Digital Social Science Center. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.

Co-located event: GEOGRAPHY 2050: Exploring Our Future in an Urbanized World, November 19-20, 2015 · New York City


The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

Digital Social Science Center The Digital Social Science Center (DSSC) brings together people, equipment, and information resources in an environment where users can work collaboratively, individually, or in consultation with a librarian and/or technology specialist. DSSC is located in Lehman Library and provides a wide range of information and technology assistance for students and faculty, including GIS.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

RWB20151118GIS

 

Research Without Borders Panel: Effecting Change in Scholarly Communication: Opportunities and Costs

Please join Columbia University Libraries’ Scholarly Communication Program for the next installation in our Research Without Borders event series, “Effecting Change in Scholarly Communication: Opportunities and Costs.” This event will take place from 2-4pm on Monday, November 21, 2016 in Garden Room 2 of Columbia’s Faculty House. It is free and open to the public, but we do ask that you register for the event using the “Reserve Your Seat” button on the Columbia Events page, available here.

The panel consists of stakeholders and observers across the scholarly enterprise who have worked to understand and effect purposeful change in the ways scholars and researchers communicate with each other. Their work seeks to better assess the costs of change and the motivations and challenges facing forward momentum across disciplinary domains, institutional initiatives, and publication practices.

 
 
Our panelists:

MacKenzie Smith, University Librarian, University of California-Davis Libraries. MacKenzie will be speaking about the Pay-It-Forward report: an investigation into a sustainable model of open access article processing charges for large North American research institutions.

Kevin Hawkins, Assistant Dean for Scholarly Communication, University of North Texas Libraries. Kevin will be discussing Project Meerkat, a project aimed “to develop guidelines and standards for digital scholarly monograph usage data and to construct a neutral organizational apparatus for the ongoing collection and aggregation of data about these scholarly publications,” and the resulting cooperative to be developed out of that project, the Publishing Analytics Data Alliance.

Peter Muennig,  Associate Professor, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. Peter will be speaking about the ourJournal open source journal publishing initiative.

This event is part of our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is sponsored by Columbia University Libraries’ Scholarly Communication Program. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm.


The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries.

“Research Without Borders” Panel to Discuss Fair Use in Art and Photography

Please join Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Center for Digital Research and Scholarship’s Scholarly Communication Program and the Copyright Advisory Office for “Research Without Borders: Fair Use, Appropriation Art and Photography”, the third event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 2-4pm on Monday, February 23, 2015 in Garden Room 2 on the 1st Floor of Columbia’s Faculty House. It is free and open to the public. If you plan to attend, please RSVP to lwilliams@columbia.edu.

“Fair use” allows the use of copyrighted materials without permission from the copyright holder under certain circumstances, offering important opportunities for educators, researchers, and others to make reasonable use of copyrighted materials. Fair use is constantly evolving: laws around fair use apply differently to different users in different situations, and fair use determinations in courts need to be made on a case-by-case basis. To mark Fair Use Week 2015, a community celebration of fair use coordinated by the Association of Research Libraries, the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship’s Scholarly Communication Program and the Copyright Advisory Office are hosting a panel discussion around freedom of expression in art and photography as it relates to fair use. Panelists will discuss fair use from different perspectives in librarianship, copyright law, photojournalism, and copyright activism, and explore the opportunities and impediments that fair use in art and photography presents.

Our panelists:

Greg Cram (@GregCram), Associate Director of Copyright and Information Policy at The New York Public Library. Greg works to make the Library’s collections broadly available to researchers and the public at large, and is responsible for developing and implementing policy and practices around the use of the Library’s collections, both online and in the Library’s physical spaces. Greg has helped steer projects through a maze of complex intellectual property issues, including the recent release of more than 20,000 high-resolution images of public domain maps. Greg is a licensed attorney in New York and Massachusetts and has represented the New York Public Library in advocating for better copyright policy, testifying before Congress about the first sale doctrine and before the United States Copyright Office about orphan works.

Rachelle Browne, Associate General Counsel, Smithsonian Institution and Adjunct Lecturer at Goucher College’s Masters in Arts Administration program. Rachelle is the co-chair of “Legal Issues in Museum Administration,” a course co-sponsored by the Smithsonian and the American Law Institute. She is a former staff attorney and attorney-advisor at the Federal Trade Commission, and general counsel to U.S. Virgin Islands Legislature and Department of Commerce.

Mickey H. Osterreicher (@nppalawyer), General Counsel for the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA); of Counsel to Hiscock & Barclay, LLP in the Media & First Amendment Law Practice Area. Mickey is on the governing board of the American Bar Association Communications Law Forum, the Media Law Resource Center (MLRC) newsgathering committee and the First Amendment Lawyers Association (FALA). Mickey is co-chair of the fair use subcommittee of the ABA Section of Intellectual Property Law section, and has drafted comments to the U.S. Copyright Office. Mickey is a Trustee of the Alexia Foundation, promoting world peace and cultural understanding through the power of photojournalism, and a member of the board of CEPA Gallery, a not-for-profit arts center. Mickey’s work has appeared in such publications as the New York Times and Time.

Parker Higgins (@xor), Director of Copyright Activism, Electronic Frontier Foundation. Parker specializes in issues at the intersection of freedom of speech and copyright, trademark, and patent law. At NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study at New York University, Parker developed a concentration of “Creativity, Freedom of Speech, and Intellectual Property”, and served on the board of the global Students for Free Culture organization and as the president of its NYU chapter. Parker previously worked for SoundCloud in Berlin, Germany.

Our moderator:

Rina Elster Pantalony, Director of Columbia University’s Copyright Advisory Office. In her role at the University, Rina creates awareness, understanding, and respect for copyright in the Columbia community. Rina is also Chair of the Standing Committee on Legal Affairs for the International Council of Museums, and is former faculty member at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts Moving Image Archive Preservation Program, where she taught courses on copyright law and policy.

 

This event is the third event this academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is co-sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Scholarly Communication Program and the Copyright Advisory Office. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.

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The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services’ Copyright Advisory Office creates awareness, understanding and respect for copyright and copyright management practices, while advocating for a robust environment that promotes preservation, access, and scholarly communications.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

A version of this press release can be found on the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship website here, and the Columbia University Libraries/Information Services website here.

Panel to Consider Innovative New Tools for Assessing Scholarly Impact

NEW YORK, November 1, 2012 –

Is the academic community ready to employ new tools to evaluate the importance and influence of scholarly works? How do “altmetrics” services and models reflect new thinking about what types of scholarly activities should be valued? Join us for “Measuring Scholarly Impact: The Influence of ‘Altmetrics’ on a Changing Conversation” for a panel discussion of these questions. This event will take place on Tuesday, November 13, at noon in Columbia’s Faculty House. It is free and open to the public.

“Altmetrics” refers to methods of measuring scholarly impact using Web-based social media. Why does it matter? In many academic fields, attaining scholarly prestige, not to mention tenure and promotion, means publishing research articles in important scholarly journals. However, many in the academic community consider a journal's prestige, which is determined by a metric calculated using the number of citations to the journal, to be a poor proxy for the quality of the individual piece or of the individual author’s work. Many uses of a scholarly work–by practitioners, policy makers, and the general public, for example–do not result in citations. At the same time, hiring and promotion committees are looking for ways to determine the impact of alternate formats now commonly used by researchers such as blogs, data sets, videos, and social media.

Our panelists are all working with innovative new tools for assessing scholarly impact:

Jason Priem is a PhD student and Royster Fellow, studying information science at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Since coining the term "altmetrics," he's remained active in the field, organizing annual altmetrics workshops, giving invited talks, and publishing peer-reviewed research. Jason is also a co-founder of ImpactStory, an open-source webapp that helps scholars track and report the broader impacts of their research. Sometimes he writes on a blog at http://jasonpriem.org/ and tweets.

Kristi Holmes is a Bioinformaticist at Becker Medical Library at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, where she works to develop and support cross-disciplinary initiatives across a variety of subject areas. Her professional interests include the development and implementation of strategies to support biomedical training and research; collaboration and research networking; open science; and understanding the impact of research efforts. She is Director of Outreach for VIVO and a member of the Washington University Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences Tracking and Evaluation Team.

Caitlin Aptowicz Trasande is Head of Science Metrics at Digital Science, a technology start-up company spun out of Nature Publishing Group, publisher of Nature. Her international team of developers leverages the latest techniques in machine learning to build software that analyzes scientific publications to support information products for science managers and decision makers. She has an undergraduate degree in Philosophy and History of Mathematics and Science from St. John's College (Annapolis), and a PhD in Neurobiology from the University of Chicago, where she trained as an electrophysiologist.

This event is the second event this academic year in the speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. Follow the discussion live on Twitter at http://twitter.com/ScholarlyComm or by using the hashtag #rwob. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at http://scholcomm.columbia.edu.

____________

The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 11 million volumes, over 150,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers. The Libraries employs more than 500 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

Panel to Consider Best Practices for Addressing Author Misconduct

NEW YORK, September 6, 2012 –

We hold the published scientific record in such high regard because we expect that it accurately reflects the results of research. But what happens when researchers tinker with their results, either with good or bad intent? Join us for “Addressing Author Misconduct: The Role of Researchers, Journals, and Institutions” to explore these questions and more. This panel discussion will take place on Thursday, September 20, at noon in Columbia’s Faculty House. The event is free and open to the public.

Though not a new issue, academic author misconduct has been in the spotlight due to recent high-profile cases such as that of Dutch social psychologist Diederik Stapel. Many are calling for more coordination among journals, research institutions, and research leaders across the globe in dealing with the range of issues broadly described as “misconduct.” At the same time, a high volume of submissions, alongside widely available digital publishing software, has put increasing pressure on journals to inspect papers for signs of questionable practices or even data manipulation. How can journals and institutions best educate researchers about misconduct and coordinate their efforts to address it? Are there ways to take more advantage of the post-publication review processes and open discussions that are occurring organically on the Web? And when misconduct is discovered, how can the digital scientific record best be corrected?

The panel will consider the issue from diverse perspectives:

Liz Williams began her career in scientific publishing in 2008 as an Associate Editor for PLoS Biology and joined The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB) as Executive Editor in 2010. JCB is published by The Rockefeller University Press and has been the industry leader in the development of standards for image data presentation and for comprehensive screening pre-publication to detect misconduct.

Martin Frank has been the Executive Director of the American Physiological Society (APS) since 1985. Frank received his PhD in Physiology and Biophysics from the University of Illinois, Urbana. His work prior to joining the APS included faculty appointments at research universities and positions at the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Health and Human Services.

Katja Brose is Editor of the journal Neuron and Executive Editor of the neuroscience portfolio at Cell Press. She received her PhD in Biochemistry from UCSF and joined Cell Press in 2000. In 2011, she was appointed Editorial Director of Reviews Strategy at Cell Press, overseeing the Trends group of reviews journals. Cell Press is an imprint of Elsevier and publishes 28 journals spanning the life sciences.

Naomi Schrag is the Associate Vice President for Research Compliance in Columbia University's Office of the Executive Vice President for Research. She oversees work on issues such as research misconduct, conflicts of interest, and international research compliance, and collaborates closely with other offices across the University to develop integrated approaches to compliance and training.

This event, cosponsored by the Columbia University Scholarly Communication Program and the Office of Research Compliance and Training, is the first event this academic year in the speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. Follow the discussion live on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ScholarlyComm or by using the hashtag #rwob. For information about Research Without Borders, and to watch a webcast of the event, please visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at http://scholcomm.columbia.edu/.

The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of  Columbia University Libraries/Information Services

The Office of Research Compliance and Training (ORCT) helps ensure that Columbia faculty and staff are in compliance with the complex web of regulatory requirements that govern research. ORCT collaborates with many other offices to foster an integrated research compliance program. ORCT administers the University’s conflict-of-interest review process for research, serves as a resource for international research compliance issues, and administers Columbia’s Standing Committee on the Conduct of Research, which addresses issues of research misconduct. ORCT works to integrate compliance education programming across the University, and to develop new programming that promotes understanding of compliance issues throughout the research enterprise.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 11 million volumes, over 150,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers. The Libraries employs more than 500 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

 

Research Without Borders 11/12 | Expanding Public Access to Research

All — please join us for “Expanding Public Access to Federally Funded Research: Implementing the OSTP Memo”, our second event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 12-2pm on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 on the third floor of Columbia’s Faculty House. It is free and open to the public. No RSVP is required.

in a policy memorandum released in February 2013, the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy Director John Holdren directed federal agencies to develop plans to make the published results of federally funded research freely available to the public within one year of publication, and required researchers to better account for and manage the digital data resulting from federally funded scientific research. Panelists will discuss and debate major proposals for addressing the directive – CHORUS, SHARE, and NIH policies.

Our panelists:

Alicia Wise is Director of Universal Access at Elsevier, where she manages Elsevier’s access strategy and policies and launches and monitors access pilot projects. Alicia previously worked for the UK Joint Information Systems Committee, the Publishers Licensing Society, The Publishers Association, and as an academic archaeologist, and holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.

Neil Thakur is Special Assistant to the Deputy Director for Extramural Research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He also serves as program manager for the NIH Public Access Policy. Prior to his time at NIH, he was Assistant Director of Health Services Research and Development at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Neil holds a Ph.D. in Health Policy from Yale University School of Public Health and completed a NIMH postdoctoral fellowship in mental health services research at the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Judy Ruttenberg is the program director for the Transforming Research Libraries strategic direction. Her responsibilities also include the E-Research Working Group and the Transforming Special Collections in the Digital Age Working Group. Prior to joining ARL, Judy was a program officer at the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN). Judy holds an MLS from the University of Maryland College Park, an MA in history from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and a BA from the University of Michigan.

Our moderator:

Elwin Wu is an Associate Director of the Columbia University School of Social Work Social Intervention Group and the Co-Director of the HIV Intervention Science Training Program for Racial/Ethnic Minority New Investigators. His practice experience includes direct clinical practice with individuals, couples, and groups with agencies serving primarily the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities; evaluation of violence prevention programs for perpetrators of intimate partner violence in same-sex relationships; and program development and evaluation for criminal justice-involved adolescents and adults.

 

This event is the second event this academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services‘ Scholarly Communication Program. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.

______________

The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

NB: This event is listed on the Columbia Libraries website here.

Expanding Public Access to Federally Funded Research: Implementing the OSTP Memo

Join us for “Expanding Public Access to Federally Funded Research: Implementing the OSTP Memo”, our second event of the academic year in our Research Without Borders panel discussion series. This event will take place from 12-2pm on Tuesday, November 12, 2013 on the third floor of Columbia’s Faculty House. It is free and open to the public. No RSVP is required.

In a policy memorandum released in February 2013, the White House’s Office of Science and Technology Policy Director John Holdren directed federal agencies to develop plans to make the published results of federally funded research freely available to the public within one year of publication, and required researchers to better account for and manage the digital data resulting from federally funded scientific research. Panelists will discuss and debate major proposals for addressing the directive – CHORUS, SHARE, and NIH policies.

Our panelists:

 

Alicia Wise is Director of Universal Access at Elsevier, where she manages Elsevier’s access strategy and policies and launches and monitors access pilot projects. Alicia previously worked for the UK Joint Information Systems Committee, the Publishers Licensing Society, The Publishers Association, and as an academic archaeologist, and holds a Ph.D. in Anthropology from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.

Neil Thakuris Special Assistant to the Deputy Director for Extramural Research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).He also serves as program manager for the NIH Public Access Policy. Prior to his time at NIH, he was Assistant Director of Health Services Research and Development at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Neil holds a Ph.D. in Health Policy from Yale University School of Public Health and completed a NIMH postdoctoral fellowship in mental health services research at the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Judy Ruttenberg is the program director for the Transforming Research Libraries strategic direction. Her responsibilities also include the E-Research Working Group and the Transforming Special Collections in the Digital Age Working Group. Prior to joining ARL, Judy was a program officer at the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN). Judy holds an MLS from the University of Maryland College Park, an MA in history from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and a BA from the University of Michigan.

Our moderator:

 

Elwin Wu is an Associate Director of the Columbia University School of Social Work Social Intervention Group and the Co-Director of the HIV Intervention Science Training Program for Racial/Ethnic Minority New Investigators. His practice experience includes direct clinical practice with individuals, couples, and groups with agencies serving primarily the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities; evaluation of violence prevention programs for perpetrators of intimate partner violence in same-sex relationships; and program development and evaluation for criminal justice-involved adolescents and adults.

 

This event is the second event this academic year in our speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. It is sponsored by Columbia University Libraries/Information Services‘ Scholarly Communication Program. Join the discussion on Twitter at #rwob and @ScholarlyComm. To watch a live webcast of the event, and for more information about Research Without Borders, visit the Scholarly Communication Program website at scholcomm.columbia.edu.

______________

The Scholarly Communication Program (SCP) supports the global reach and impact of research produced at Columbia University. Its mission is to explore and raise awareness about new research tools, methods, and support services that are available to Columbia faculty, students, and staff. In pursuit of this mission, the SCP hosts events and workshops, curates news and resources on our Web site, and engages in innovative scholarly communication initiatives on campus and in the wider academic community. The SCP is an initiative of the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship, which is part of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services.

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS) is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 12 million volumes, over 160,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers, including affiliates. CUL/IS employs more than 450 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

NB: This event is listed on the Columbia Libraries website here.

Research Data Symposium To Be Held At Columbia, February 27, 2013

Columbia University Libraries/Information Services, Columbia’s Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering, Center for Digital Research and Scholarship and Elsevier are pleased to announce the Research Data Symposium, an event to lead discussion on topics related to managing and curating research data and a variety of research outputs. The Symposium will be held at Columbia’s Faculty House on Wednesday, February 27, 2013.The Symposium will offer speaker panels that address the different stages of the research data life cycle. Representatives from Columbia University faculty, learned societies, research institutions, funders, and publishers will come together to examine the implementation stages, available technologies and associated challenges and barriers for managing, preserving and accessing research data. Attendees will learn about research dissemination stages, implementation challenges, available technologies and trends associated with curation and management of research data and other forms of digital content beyond the journal. Furthermore, attendees will leave armed with valuable information to engage their respective organizational stakeholders to initiate and continue long-term research and data management efforts.

In addition to the panels, the Symposium will feature poster sessions addressing any or all aspects of the data life cycle. The Center for Digital Research and Scholarship is currently calling for posters (poster commitments due February 8, final posters due February 22.)

James Neal, University Librarian at Columbia, commented: “Columbia Libraries/Information Services are honored to host this symposium on the challenges of managing the life cycle of research data across the arenas of creation to use to preservation. The speakers reflect the mandate for a new radical collaboration among researcher, funder, publisher, information professional and technologist.”

David Marques, Senior Vice President Research Data Services at Elsevier, added: “The potential opportunities presented by the nature of digital research data management are both extraordinary and challenging. Elsevier is proud to collaborate with Columbia to support an event that will lead the discussion and enhance the knowledge of stakeholders in the research community.”Space for the Symposium is limited. To register, please RSVP on the Symposium website here.

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Program Schedule and Speakers

9 am – Registration and continental breakfast

9:30am – Keynotes
•   James G. Neal, University Librarian, Columbia University
•   David Marques, Elsevier
•   Peter Murray-Rust, University of Cambridge

10:15am – Panel 1: Plan & Collect
•   Joan Starr, California Digital Library
•   Gail Steinhart, Cornell University Libraries
•   George Alter, Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)
•   Michael F. Huerta, National Institutes of Health
•   Victoria Stodden, Department of Statistics, Columbia University (respondent)
•   Moderator TBD

11.45am-12.30pm – Buffet Lunch

12:30pm – Panel 2: Assure, Describe & Preserve
•   Jake Carlson, Distributed Data Curation Center, Purdue University
•   Linda Beebe, Former Senior Director of PsycINFO, American Psychological Association
•   Steven Morales, The Digital Preservation Network
•   Bob Chen, Center for International Earth Science Information Network at Earth Institute, Columbia University (respondent)
•   David Madigan, Department of Statistics, Columbia University (moderator)

2:00pm – Panel 3: Integrate & Analyze
•   Heather Piwowar, ImpactStory
•   Susan McGregor, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
•   Mark Hansen, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism (respondent)
•   Kathy McKeown, Department of Computer Science, Columbia University (moderator)

3:00pm: Coffee Break

3:15pmPanel 4: Discover, Share, & Impact
•   Micah Altman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Libraries
•   Gerhard Klimeck, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University
•   Mark Hahnel, Figshare
•   Denis Tenen, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University (respondent)
•   Kenneth Crews, Columbia University Libraries (moderator)

4:30pm – Closing Remarks
•   Jan Brase, German National Library of Science and Technology

5pm: End

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Columbia University Libraries/Information Services (CUL/IS)
CUL/IS is one of the top five academic research library systems in North America. The collections include over 11 million volumes, over 150,000 journals and serials, as well as extensive electronic resources, manuscripts, rare books, microforms, maps, and graphic and audio-visual materials. The services and collections are organized into 22 libraries and various academic technology centers. The Libraries employs more than 500 professional and support staff. The website of the Libraries is the gateway to its services and resources: library.columbia.edu.

The Institute for Data Sciences and Engineering (IDSE)
IDSE at Columbia University strives to be the single world-leading institution in research and education in the theory and practice of the emerging field of data science broadly defined. Equally important in this mission is supporting and encouraging entrepreneurial ventures emerging from the research IDSE conducts. To accomplish this goal, the Institute seeks to forge closer relationships between faculty already at the University, to hire new faculty, to attract interdisciplinary graduate students interested in problems relating to big data, and to build strong and mutually beneficial relationships with industry partners. The Institute seeks to attract external funding from both federal and industrial sources to support its research and educational mission.

The Center for Digital Research and Scholarship (CDRS)
CDRS serves the digital research and scholarly communications needs of the faculty, students, and staff of Columbia University and its affiliates. Our mission is to increase the utility and impact of research produced at Columbia by creating, adapting, implementing, supporting, and sustaining innovative digital tools and publishing platforms for content delivery, discovery, analysis, data curation, and preservation. In pursuit of that mission, we also engage in extensive outreach, education, and advocacy to ensure that the scholarly work produced at Columbia University has a global reach and accelerates the pace of research across disciplines. CDRS, led by Rebecca Kennison, is one of six entities that comprise the Digital Programs and Technology Services branch of Columbia University Libraries/Information Services. The Center was created in July 2007 to address the ongoing evolution of researchers’ and scholars’ needs as new technologies, policies, and systems of knowledge support arise.

Elsevier
Elsevier is a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services. The company works in partnership with the global science and health communities to publish more than 2,000 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and close to 20,000 book titles, including major reference works from Mosby and Saunders. Elsevier’s online solutions include ScienceDirect, Scopus, Reaxys, ClinicalKey and Mosby’s Nursing Suite, which enhance the productivity of science and health professionals, and the SciVal suite and MEDai’s Pinpoint Review, which help research and health care institutions deliver better outcomes more cost-effectively. A global business headquartered in Amsterdam, Elsevier employs 7,000 people worldwide. The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world-leading publisher and information provider, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

NB: A version of this press release can be found on the Columbia Libraries website here, and the Center for Digital Research and Scholarship blog here.

Addressing Author Misconduct: The Role of Researchers, Journals, and Institutions

Research Without Borders
Thursday, September 20, 2012
 

We hold the published scientific record in such high regard because we expect that it accurately reflects the results of research. But what happens when researchers tinker with their results, either with good or bad intent? Join us for “Addressing Author Misconduct: The Role of Researchers, Journals, and Institutions” to explore these questions and more. This panel discussion will take place on Thursday, September 20, at noon in Columbia’s Faculty House. The event is free and open to the public.

Though not a new issue, academic author misconduct has been in the spotlight due to recent high-profile cases such as that of Dutch psychologist Diederik Stapel. Many are calling for more coordination among journals, research institutions, and research leaders across the globe in dealing with the range of issues broadly described as “misconduct.” At the same time, a high volume of submissions, alongside widely available digital publishing software, has put increasing pressure on journals to inspect papers for signs of questionable practices or even data manipulation. How can journals and institutions best educate researchers about misconduct and coordinate their efforts to address it? Are there ways to take more advantage of the post-publication review processes and open discussions that are occurring organically on the Web? And when misconduct is discovered, how can the digital scientific record best be corrected?

The panel will consider the issue from diverse perspectives. The panelists are:
Liz Williams is Executive Editor of The Journal of Cell Biology.
Martin Frank is Executive Director of the American Physiological Society.
Katja Brose is Editor of the journal Neuron.
Naomi Schrag is the Associate Vice President for Research Compliance at Columbia University

This event, cosponsored by the Columbia University Office of Research Compliance and Training and Scholarly Communication Program, is the first event this academic year in the speaker series Research Without Borders: The Changing World of Scholarly Communication. Watch the live webcast here: http://scholcomm.columbia.edu/events/live-webcast/. You can also follow the discussion on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ScholarlyComm or by using the hashtag #rwob.

Will Congress Mandate Public Access to Federally Funded Research?

Of the recent efforts to move the open access agenda forward, the one with the most impact has undoubtedly been the passing in Spring 2008 of the NIH Public Access Policy. This requires that all published research resulting from NIH funding be made publicly accessible within 12 months of publication in a peer-reviewed journal. By the end of 2009 70% of those articles were already in the PMC database, with more being submitted in following months. Full compliance appears to be likely since researchers who want to submit future grant applications will need to prove compliance for past grants. Along with the increase in submissions NIH has seen the use of the PMC database double since March 2008–with 99% of articles downloaded at least once and 28% more than 100 times and more than 420,000 unique users each day.

It’s understandable then that new legislation before Congress that extends this policy is eliciting strong support and enthusiasm from those of us who believe that open access is where scholarly communication needs to go. The bipartisan Federal Research Public Access Act, (FRPAA), introduced in the Senate in June 2009 and in the House in April 2010, would require that 11 U.S. Government agencies with annual extramural research expenditures of over $100 million make manuscripts of journal articles stemming from research funded by that agency publicly available via the Internet within six months of publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

During the summer discussions about public access to research heated up. At the end of July the Information Policy, Census and National Archives Subcommittee of the House Committee on Government Oversight & Reform, held hearings on “Public Access to Federally Funded Research.” The testimony provided by the three panels gives a good sense of the current state of the open access debate with a convincing case made by those in support of OA. The publishers (represented by Alan Adler for the AAP and Dr. Steven Breckler for the APA) focused on the lack of need for OA, the danger to the publishing industry, concerns about copyright and OA somehow increasing the likelihood of piracy, and a loss of the U.S.’s competitive advantage. Throughout both talked a lot about the value of peer review, but failed to note that researchers are not paid for reviewing and do this gratis as part of their service to the scholarly community and the furtherance of good science i.e. this is yet another way that publishers benefit from the “free” work of researchers.

Panelists speaking on behalf of open access addressed and successfully refuted all these points emphasizing: that there is a powerful need for OA; that OA is good for the economy;  that the NIH mandate has not had a negative impact on journal publishers to date; and that PLoS has demonstrated that open access journals can be successful. Indeed Adler and Breckler failed to respond to the Chairman’s question as to whether they could provide data on how publishers have been adversely impacted by public access policies. One’s feeling is that the same tired old arguments are getting weaker as the OA movement grows and proves that OA actually works! A few highlights from pro-OA panelists:

  • In contrast to Adler’s point about negative economic impacts, Nobel prize winning scientist, Sir Richard Roberts, currently Chief Scientific Officer of a small biotech company, spoke eloquently about lack of access having “a deleterious impact on small start-up biotech companies and others for whom cutting edge science is their bread and butter.” Roberts also emphasized the need for access to scientific research in small liberal arts colleges, important feeders for graduate programs, and noted that the next generation of scientists are being nurtured in our high schools and increasingly need access to the literature.
  • Equally compelling  was the testimony of Dr. Sophia Colamarino, Vice President for Research at Autism Speaks, and responsible for advising on research expenditures in the $20-$30 million dollar range.  Colamarino’s personal experience of access was eye-opening. She noted that “On a Friday I finished my research associate position at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, CA, where I had full access to scientific literature. On a Monday I started my new position as Science Director of an international research sponsoring organization, and had none.”
  • Sharon Terry, CEO of the Genetic Alliance spoke on behalf of members of the public faced with rare health issues. Noting that when she and her husband began reading about their childrens’ rare disease they “didn’t know a gene from a hubcap” she described the difficulty they had getting access to the literature, how by borrowing, hacking and stealing they managed to get access, and how they successfully advanced the understanding of the disease.

FRPAA is by no means a done deal yet. Watch for news of developments on this blog. For more information and to find out how you can provide your support see: http://www.taxpayeraccess.org/issues/frpaa/index.shtml